Homecoming History

by Catherine Arjet

by Catherine Arjet

assistant arts and life editor

Homecoming is an all-American tradition of food, football and the return of alumni. It seems as if it has always existed, along with tailgating and apple pie. However, like all other things, homecoming had to begin somewhere. At Millsaps, it began Nov. 17, 1928, when the Millsaps Majors beat the Southwestern Louisiana Wildcats 31-7. Along with providing an opportunity for alums and parents to come to campus, this original homecoming also honored the groundbreaking of Sullivan-Harrell Hall.  This years homecoming will take place October 24-26th.

The tradition of Homecoming actually began almost 20 years earlier, it just took Millsaps a while to adapt to it. According to a 1941 Purple and White article, no one knows exactly who started Millsaps homecoming; it was more of a general push from the student body. Although this initial homecoming was a success, the administration decided to have the alumni vote on making homecoming a regular event.

Millsaps homecoming, which was originally called “Dads and Homecoming day,” featured activities similar to the ones we have today, including class reunions and football. However, unlike our current homecoming weekend, the festivities lasted only a day. In the ’30s and ’40s, homecoming expanding to include Greek open houses, and a short play by the theater department. Although homecoming court seems an integral part of the festivities now, Millsaps did not crown our first homecoming queen until 1954, when Edna Khayat won the crown, as well as the title of Miss Millsaps (a Millsaps yearbook tradition that carried on well into the ’60s).

Despite all the changes it has gone through in its 86-year-long lifespan, Millsaps homecoming has remained a well-enjoyed return of old students and celebration of our school.

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